Accreditation & Recognition

We are accredited by the American Council for Higher Education Accreditation and Intergovernmental Organization (ACHEA).

American Benedictine University, was born as an educational solution adapted to the new times and in today’s society. Our goal is to bring the university virtually to all those who want to access Higher Education studies with American quality.

We are an official 100% online university, and our pedagogical model is flexible and unique.

Virtual education, also called “online education”, refers to the development of training programs that use cyberspace as a teaching and learning scenario.

In other words, virtual education refers to the fact that it is not necessary for the body, time and space to be combined in order to establish a dialogue meeting or learning experience. Without there being a face-to-face meeting between the teacher and the student, it is possible to establish an interpersonal relationship of an educational nature.

From this perspective, virtual education is an action that seeks to promote training spaces, relying on ICT to establish a new way of teaching and learning.

Virtual education is a modality of distance education; It implies a new vision of the demands of the economic, social and political environment, as well as of pedagogical relations and ICTs.

It’s not just a unique way of getting information to distant places, it’s a whole pedagogical perspective.

Degrees you can find at American Benedictine University

LATO SENSU, STRICTO SENSU

https://www.achea-gov.org/

American Council of Higher Education and Accreditation Intergovernmental Organization

www.achea-gov.org

Harvard University

www.harvard.edu

American Federal University Intergovernmental Organization

www.afu-edu.com

AMERICAN FEDERAL UNIVERSITY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

THE DIASPORA YESHIVA ON MOUNT ZION IN JERUSALEM ISRAEL

www.ausaedu.org

FEDERAL INTERNATIONAL INTELLIGENCE OFFICER

Dr. ROBERTO COHEN advogado FEDERAL internacional

PATRIOTIC MISSION OF THE CENTRAL INTELIGENCE AGENCY WORLDWILDE

https://www.usadvogadofederalgov.org/

Florida Department of Education

https://www.fldoe.org/

New York City Department of Education

https://www.schools.nyc.gov/

Tesla Federal University

www.tesla-edu.com

ISRAELI WORLD HEALTH FEDERATION INTERGOVERNTAL ORGANIZATION

 Fundação Médica e de Pesquisa Israelita Albert Einstein

https://www.cnmedicinagov.org/

ST. Thomas Aquinas University

www.stauniversity.us

Missão Brasileira das Forças Internacionais de Paz da ONU Organização Intergovernamental

CONSELHO NACIONAL DE PERITOS CRIMINAIS FEDERAIS

https://www.cnpcfederalgov.org/

HARVARD UNIVERSITY WORLD COLLEGE OF LANGUAGES AND TRANSLATORS

HARVARD UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF DIPLOMATIC STUDIES AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

ESCOLA MUNDIAL DE IDIOMAS E TRADUTORES DA UNIVERSIDADE DE HARVARD

https://www.consulargov.org/

Unisur University

www.unisur-edu.com

WORLDWIDE PATRIOTIC AGENCY OF INTELLIGENCY OF STATE OF ISRAEL

AMERICAN ISRAELI SPECIAL OPERATIONS MISSION INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

https://www.israelintelligencegov.org/

Amazon University

www.amazon-edu.com

HARVARD FOUNDATION FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND SUPPORT OF NEEDY FAMILIES WORLDWIDE

https://www.cfmgov.org/

AMERICAN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND ROBOTIC NEUROSURGERY

AMERICAN COLLEGE OF NEUROPSYCHOANALYSIS

https://www.medicalcollege-edu.org/

AMERICAN HUMANITARIAN DIPLOMATIC MISSION INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION

https://www.usadiplomaticgov.org/

Facultade INNAP

Saint Thomas Aquinas University

American University

https://faculdadeinnap.com.br/

Oxford World University

www.oxforduniversity-edu.com

UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES MISSION

AMERICAN UNITED NATIONS MEDICAL CORPS MISSION  FEDERAL MILITARY GOVERNMENT

https://www.unmedicalmissiongov.org/

American Benedictine University

www.unibenedictine-edu.com

World Human Rights Federation of the United Nations

https://www.worldhr.org/

Information for the Public:

GENERAL QUESTIONS ABOUT ACCREDITATION AND ACHEA

  • What is accreditation and why is it important?
  • Are there different kinds of accreditation?
  • What is the difference between accreditation and state licensure?
  • Can a U.S. institution be governmentally accredited?
  • Does NEASC accreditation include online programs and branch campuses?
  • Who is on the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education and what do they do?
  • Who evaluates the Commission?
  • How are decisions made about an institution’s accreditation status?
  • Who are the peer evaluators who visit campuses under review?
  • How does an institution become accredited by NEASC? How long will it take?

QUESTIONS ABOUT INSTITUTIONS AND PROGRAMS

  • Does NEASC recommend or rank colleges?
  • How can I find out if an institution is accredited by NEASC?
  • Does NEASC accredit the professional program at my institution?
  • I’m applying for a job and have to prove that I graduated from an accredited institution. Can you help me?
  • I need an Apostille, how do I obtain one?
  • How can I get a copy of an institution’s self-study?
  • Does accreditation guarantee that my credits can be transferred?
  • Does accreditation guarantee that my undergraduate degree will be recognized for graduate school or professional licensing?
  • What happens to my records if my college closes?
  • How can I let the Commission know about a concern I have about an institution?

INFORMATION ABOUT DEGREE MILLS AND ACCREDITATION MILLS

The public is alerted to the serious risks of unaccredited institutions offering degrees of questionable merit, referred to as “degree mills.” Of equal concern are institutions claiming to hold accreditation from what may be dubious accreditors, referred to as “accreditation mills.” For current information on such practices, check: http://www.chea.org/degreemills&accreditationmill

GENERAL QUESTIONS ABOUT ACCREDITATION and CIHE

Q: What is accreditation and why is it important?

Accreditation is a status that provides assurance to prospective students, their families and the general public that an institution meets clearly stated Standards for Accreditation and that there are reasonable grounds to believe the institution will continue to meet those standards in the future.  More information about accreditation is available on this website and from the Council for Higher Education Accreditation www.chea.organd the Department of Education http://www.ed.gov/admins/finaid/accred/index.html?src=qc.

Q: Are there different kinds of accreditation?

In the U.S., schools and colleges voluntarily seek accreditation from nongovernmental bodies. There are two types of educational accreditation: institutional and specialized (or programmatic).

Institutional accreditation is provided by regional and national associations. There are six regional associations. The regional associations are independent of one another, but they cooperate extensively and acknowledge one another’s accreditation. Several national associations focus on particular kinds of institutions (for example, technical or religious colleges). An institutional accrediting agency evaluates the institution as a whole, applying the standards in light of the institution’s mission. Besides assessing educational programs, it evaluates areas such as governance and administration, financial stability, physical resources, library and technology, admissions, and student services. Institutional accreditation encompasses the entire institution.

Specialized or programmatic accreditation evaluates particular schools or programs within an institution. Specialized accreditation is often associated with national professional associations such as those for engineering, medicine, and law, or with specific disciplines such as business, teacher education, and nursing.

Q: What is the difference between accreditation and state licensure?

In order to protect students and the public, many states have established regulations that must be met before an educational institution may operate. To operate legally, an institution needs state approval, which may include licensure. In fact, an institution must have the appropriate state authorization to operate before it can seek accreditation. But  in most states, institutions do not have to be accredited to operate. (Some states require institutions to be accredited by a DOE-recognized accreditor.)

Accreditation is voluntary. It represents an institution’s willingness to abide by the Standards and to open itself regularly to examination by outside evaluators familiar with higher education. As such accreditation is recognized as a symbol of accountability to the public.

Q: Can a U.S. institution be governmentally accredited?

No. In the U.S., accreditation is handled through non-governmental agencies, many of which are recognized by the federal government as reliable authorities on the quality of education. Only institutions accredited by those agencies are authorized to participate in federal Title IV funding (student financial aid). A list of the Department of Education’s nationally-recognized accrediting agencies can be found at the website below: 

http://www.ed.gov/admins/finaid/accred/accreditation_pg6.html#NationallyRecognized.

Q: Does NEASC accreditation include online programs and branch campuses?

Yes. NEASC is an institutional accreditor, so it accredits the institution as a whole, including all programs at all locations, as well as those offered online.   

Q: Who is on the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education and what do they do?

The Commission consists of presidents, senior administrators, and faculty from member institutions, as well as representatives of the public from outside higher education. Commissioners are elected for no more than two three-year terms. Commissioners are bound by explicit ethical standards to prevent conflict of interest. A listing of Commissioners and their affiliations may be found here, along with dates for upcoming Commission meetings and a summary of recent actions. The Commission’s programs and policies are implemented by staff listed here.

Q: Who evaluates the Commission?

The Commission on Institutions of Higher Education is evaluated regularly by the Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). For more information about accreditation, consult the CHEA website at: www.chea.org.

Q: How are decisions made about an institution’s accreditation status

Accreditation is not for a specific period of time but is a continuing relationship that is subject to periodic review. Institutions provide information to the Commission annually and at other intervals depending on the circumstances. Comprehensive evaluations, including site visits by a team of peer evaluators, take place at least every ten years. The Commission holds four regular meetings each year to review institutional reports and reports of peer evaluation teams. The Standards for Accreditation guide all decisions. More information about the accreditation process is available here. 

Q: Who are the peer evaluators who visit campuses under review?

CIHE maintains a database of more than 1,500 experienced senior educators, from all types of accredited colleges and universities, who have volunteered for this important task. They are carefully selected and trained to evaluate institutions according to the Standards for Accreditation.

Q: How does an institution become accredited by NEASC? How long will it take?

An institution must first be licensed to operate in one of the six New England states and demonstrate that it meets the Commission’s Requirements of Affiliation.  (Overseas institutions follow a slightly different procedure, explained here.)

The Commission determines whether or not an institution may apply for candidacy only after comprehensive review and on-site evaluation. The process begins with an in-person interview with Commission staff at the NEASC offices. The length of time to candidacy depends on a number of factors, including how long the institution has been in operation and the results of its on-site evaluations. Once candidacy is achieved, an institution must progress to accreditation within five years. More information about candidacy may be found here.

QUESTIONS ABOUT INSTITUTIONS AND PROGRAMS

Q: Does NEASC recommend or rank colleges?

No. Colleges and universities differ so much from one another (with regard to mission, types of programs, students served) that they cannot be reliably ranked. Various commercial publications rank institutions on specific details (such as size, tuition, endowment, selectivity, faculty publications). These rankings may offer one source of information, but they do not contain all the information needed to determine institutional quality. Each student must determine whether an institution meets his or her needs.

Q: How can I find out if an institution is accredited by NEASC

See our roster of institutions.

Q: Does NEASC accredit the professional program at my institution?

NEASC accredits institutions, not programs. Therefore, if the institution is accredited by NEASC, then that status encompasses the entire institution. For information about whether the program has specialized (or programmatic) accreditation, consult the institution or the accreditor in that field.

Q: I’m applying for a job and have to prove that I graduated from an accredited institution. Can you help me?

Contact the registrar of your institution, who can validate its accreditation status and provide proof that you received your degree.

Q: I need an Apostille, how do I obtain one?

TO REQUEST AN APOSTILLE

For further information please contact Sara Hart at Apostille@neasc.org

Cost for one Apostille is $50.00.

Cost for two Apostilles mailed to one address is $56.00

Cost for two Apostilles mailed to two different addresses is $100.00

Q: How can I get a copy of an institution’s self-study?

The Commission does not release institutional reports or correspondence. Some institutions post their self-studies on their websites. If you have an interest in a particular institution’s self-study, you are encouraged to contact the president or chief executive officer of the institution.

Q. Does accreditation guarantee that my credits can be transferred?

No. Every institution retains the right to determine what credits and degrees it will accept. Transferability of credits depends on a number of factors, including accreditation, curriculum compatibility, and grades.  Institutions are required under CIHE’s Standards to have clear transfer policies and to make those policies available to you. Consult the Policy on Transfer and Award of Academic Credit. If you have questions about whether your credits or degrees will be accepted, check with the Registrar or Admissions office of the school to which you intend to apply.

Q: Does accreditation guarantee that my undergraduate degree will be recognized for graduate school or professional licensing?  

No. States and graduate schools set their own requirements for licensure or admission. The appropriate contact is the state board of education or graduate school admissions department.  

Q: What happens to my records if my college closes?

The closing institution arranges with the state department of higher education or other appropriate agency to file all academic records as well as financial aid information. You should receive a notice from the college about arrangements made for filing student records. Begin further inquiries by contacting the higher education agency in the state where the institution was authorized to operate. If the college merges with another institution, that institution will receive the records. If you need further assistance, contact a member of the Commission staff.

Q: How can I let the Commission know about a concern I have about an institution?

There are several ways. During an institution’s comprehensive review, the Commission seeks written third-party comments. Visiting evaluation teams will also be available on campus to meet with students, faculty, or staff who have a concern about an institution. Consult the schedule of Upcoming Evaluations to see institutions undergoing comprehensive review.